How-To Understand and Navigate the Provisions and Rules for Pre-Removal Risk Assessment (PRRA)

Search this article on Google: How-To Understand and Navigate the Provisions and Rules for Pre-Removal Risk Assessment (PRRA)

How to Understand and Navigate the Provisions and Rules for PRRA

How to Understand and Navigate the Provisions and Rules for Pre-Removal Risk Assessment (PRRA)

The PRRA process can be complicated, but breaking it down into small steps can make it easier to understand and navigate. This guide will walk you through the essentials.

  1. Understanding PRRA

    Before you begin, it’s critical to have a strong understanding of what PRRA entails.

    • PRRA is an opportunity for people who face removal from Canada to seek protection by describing the dangers or risks they believe they would face if removed.

    • Eligibility for a PRRA is decided on a case-by-case basis. Not everyone who faces removal from Canada is eligible.

    • Undergoing a PRRA does not guarantee that you will be allowed to stay in Canada.

  2. Determining Eligibility

    Your removal order must be in effect to be eligible for PRRA. You cannot apply for PRRA if your removal order is stayed.

    • Individuals who are ineligible:

      • If less than 12 months have passed since your last PRRA or refugee claim was rejected or determined ineligible.
      • If less than 12 months have passed since a previous refugee claim was abandoned or withdrawn.
      • Claimants from a safe country.
  3. Preparing your PRRA Application

    Once you’ve determined your eligibility, the next step is to prepare your application.

    • Filling out the application:

      • Provide all necessary personal information.
      • Detail the risks you believe you would face if removed from Canada.
      • Include any supporting documents.
    • Submitting your application:

      • Submit your completed application and any supporting documents to the Canada Border Services Agency.
      • Understand that an officer will review your application and decide whether you are at risk if removed from Canada.
  4. Receiving and Understanding Your Decision

    After your PRRA application is reviewed, you’ll receive a decision that will carry significant implications.

    • If the officer accepts your PRRA application:

      • You will not be removed from Canada for the time being.
      • You will be eligible to apply for protected person status.
    • If the officer rejects your PRRA application:

      • You must leave Canada or face deportation.
      • You may not be eligible to apply for PRRA again for another 12 months.
  5. Seek legal advice

    Because PRRA is a serious and complex procedure, it may be beneficial to seek legal counsel. A lawyer or legal advisor experienced in immigration law can provide guidance and aid you in the application process.